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Dog Control Harness

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John Bull's picture
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Joined: 14.05.2011

We have had many German Shepherds - big ones - and they can really pull on the lead when they see something of interest - cats ?

Both me and my wife have taken a fall when suddenly pulled and it hurts. You can easily damage a knee, wrist or elbow badly if caught off guard. It can be serious.

Elderly people are particularly  at risk of being at constant pulling strain or being pulled over by a sudden pull.

We have tried several "Halter" collars, all of which vary from useless to not too bad, but none of them have been a success.

My Rottie Kaiser at 50 kg, has a pull like the Space Shuttle at boost. Rotties have the power of a bull. So not wishing to emulate a chariotless Charlton Heston in Ben-Hur, We looked round for a really good restraining collar and asked many people. I surfed the Internet inside out.

We found one that is a marvellous design, strong and inexpensive - it is called The Kumfi Dogalter designed by George Grayson. The link is :-

http://www.kumfi.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1&category_id=20&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=8

But just look for www.kumfi.com and find the dog products. At about £8.50 it is a sensational bargain and IT WORKS !

My Rottie is very controllable using the Kumfi collar and although you still get a pull of course, the force is vastly reduced. My verdict is that this collar is by far the best on the market.

It does not have a side connector, it attaches to the main collar loop  centrally under the  dogs chin. Side pull collars can be dangerous by exerting a sudden pull on the dogs neck. Kumfi does not do this.

Also, the Kumfi does not ride up and endanger the eyes like many other collars do.

If you have a "pull" problem, then try a Kumfi.

John

VetNurse's picture
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Joined: 07.01.2010
Great tip with the collar.

Great tip with the collar.

samsam's picture
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Joined: 23.03.2010
Have you tried an obedience

Have you tried an obedience class to teach the dog to walk properly on a loose leash and collar. In the long run, you are not doing the dog any favors to let them continue to pull you around. Is it just counter-intuitive to use a harness on a dog when you are already having a pulling problem. You simply do not have the control with any harness that you have with a collar.

John Bull's picture
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Joined: 14.05.2011
My dear Samsam, The whole

My dear Samsam,

The whole object of my note is nothing whatever to do  with obedience, it is to do with some dogs natural tendency to pull on the lead, but primarily it is to do with the sudden thrust that a dog can exert when it sees something interesting. Like I said - cats for example.

Also it specifically applies to large powerful dogs that can easily have their owner straddled on the floor with no effort at all. My Rottie would have no problems dragging you around the local park.

Forget obedience please. This tip is  for those owners who simply wish to control their large dogs with a minimum of effort and eliminate any possible injury to either the dog or owner.

If anybody does not like a collar- assist, then do whatever you wish, but these restraints ARE beneficial, do not harm the dog and are simply intended as a very useful accessory.

For heavens sake, obedience ? We are simply trying to reduce the animals strength factor and make control much safer and easier.

If obedience was the answer, then we would not need a Police Force to control our own behaviour would we ?

Why on Earth do you think we have harnesses on horses or rings through bulls noses etc. ? Whatever training you may carry out and however obedient you may think your horse is, you would be a complete idiot to try riding it without a harness. Six foot high at 20-30 mph is a hell of a way to hit Mother Earth.

Nobody has said that a collar restraint is NECESSARY, just that it is a solution to the problem of strong pulls and unpredictable behaviour. If you do not agree or do not like such devices, be my guest and take another route. If obedience is the ultimate panacea to stop Granny from being dragged around the local high street when her big Irish Wolfhound flips his lid at the noise of a Police siren, then YABBA-DABBA-DOO, have a nice day.

John

Just one final point of obedience. If obedience is the magical answer to dog control, why have a lead at all ? I don`t think  that needs any elaborate explanation.

princess01's picture
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Joined: 06.12.2009
My friend has a dog without a

My friend has a dog without a lead but it is a german shepard, I would not even risk my dog without a lead.

John Bull's picture
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Joined: 14.05.2011
Hello Princess, A German

Hello Princess,

A German Shepherd going for walkies with no lead !!

That is called ignorance and irresponsibility on the part of the owner. "Some Muvvers  do `av `em"

VetNurse's picture
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Joined: 07.01.2010
Leads were invented for a

Leads were invented for a reason.

John Bull's picture
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Joined: 14.05.2011
Leads were invented so that

Leads were invented so that owners did not have to resort to that £1 million third party allowance in their insurance policy that covers them for causing death, injury, destruction and mayhem in the civilised world. IF the insurance company do not withdraw the cover for being utterly negligent, THEN I hope these  ignorant dog owners have got a mighty deep financial pocket or a very expensive house.

By law, every dog owner is totally responsible for any damage to property or death and injury caused by their dog.

John

admin's picture
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Joined: 30.03.2009
I never knew that.

I never knew that. Interesting. I have seen many dogs have a "pull" problem and it can be quite exhausting for owners as well as the dog. Sounds like there is some good advice here.

samsam's picture
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Joined: 23.03.2010
Well I totally agree with the

Well I totally agree with the lead argument.  I love riding with my dog (a 4 year old Blue Heeler named Jessie), and she welcomes the chance to run with the big dog (me). I usually wait until late in the evening when there's nobody out so she won't be distracted. She's up to about 4 miles of pretty fast paced jogging. I believe she would go a lot further if I asked her to.

She's really good about staying right with me, or if she stops to snuffle around a fire hydrant she'll come running up as soon as I call her, but I would feel much better if I had her on a leash.

minimouse22's picture
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Joined: 01.12.2009
Your in the minority SamSam I

Your in the minority SamSam I need my lead or I will not have a dog.